Eocene Arts presents objects born of the human experience of nature.

Eocene Arts takes its name from the Eocene epoch, when the Earth was warmer, wetter, and at times covered from pole to pole in forest. In the Eocene the first flowers appeared and so too the first fruits and pollinator insects, and many first mammals. The Eocene, which concluded 30 million years ago, was a time of fecundity and transformation from which we might learn much today.

Eocene Arts presents objects bearing human knowledge of the shapes and colors that lie within the stones, soils, plants, ash, and waters all around. The objects created are a form of landscape art. Expertly crafted yet brilliantly intuitive, they have a quality and coherence uncommon in the world today. As with all such work--whether the cave paintings at Lascaux, the shrine at Ise, or Jackson Pollock's Autumn Rhythm--the maker is present as medium rather than master. It can be said that such things are born, not made, and that they improve through time and in use.

Eocene Arts features Japanese art and craft, where nature's beauty and ephemerality has long been a unifying aesthetic motif, but we also seek kindred objects of other peoples and places. We are less interested in an object's historical significance than in its capacity to reveal. We seek models for the future rather than relics of the past.

Eocene Arts has provided such works to leading galleries of ceramic, bamboo, and lacquer arts in New York and London as well as to important private collections of works by Kawai Kanjiro and Otagaki Rengetsu. We invite inquiries regarding present or prospective works.




inquiries@eocene-arts.com